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Discovering Different men called Jesus in the New Testament—Part One, No. 2: Psychology of Jesus–How I lost Jesus and Found Art

How I lost Jesus and found Art

1. Introduction: Learning to fear and love God

2. Psychology of daily Bible reading to find Jesus

3. God’s gift: fear and love

4. Living Biblical Literalism

5. Mistake of questioning god-fearing parents

6. Rebellion

7. Sex and Jesus

7a. Sex, sin, and psychology

7b. Masturbation

7c. Impure thoughts

7d. Adultery

7e. Rhythm and babies

7f. Sex only in everlasting marriage

8. Children force adults into pedophile actions

8a. Sworn to secrecy to protect pastors

8b. Rod of Jesse and Staff of Life

9. Becoming disillusioned with Jesus—and god

9a. Epistles of Paul detailing the life and ministry of Jesus

Bibliography

Index
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1. Introduction: Learning to fear and love God

Lutheran children are taught to obey god and their parents who stand in place of god: to work hard, memorize Martin Luther’s Small Catechism, and obey “authorities.” Martin Luther wrote and preached that parents were deputies of God on earth, and their rule was to be accepted as the law of God.

<i>Hans and Margarethe Ludder (Luther), Martin's parents</i>

Hans and Margarethe Ludder (Luther), Martin’s parents

I worked hard to be a part of the circle of saved children who obeyed god and parents. I loved my father openly–while hating him silently as he thrashed me in the same bloody manner as Martin Luther’s parents beat him until the blood ran. Father was keeping the Scriptures and winning for himself a place in heaven.1 This is required of a loving Jesus. This Jesus, however, only makes a brief cameo appearance in the Bible canon.
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2. Psychology of daily Bible reading to find Jesus

<i>Circumcision is an aberration</i>

Circumcision is an aberration

As a child, I read the Bible daily. It confused me. It contradicted itself as much as did my parents.

I wondered why I could not love and follow Jesus unless I learned to hate my parents and my siblings? The Book of Luke quotes Jesus as saying, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple.”2

The minister at our Zion Lutheran Church had a different passage he read. The pastor preached from the Book of John. He read: “Anyone who hates a brother or sister is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life residing in him.”3

When I was a small child, I liked my mother and father. I even liked my older sister and younger brother: we were family. All claimed they believed in the Bible. The question for me was (1) which version, (2) which gospel, and (3) why? Which gospel was right? Luke or John? Which version? We used King James Version of 1611. But there were other versions, and other translations.

Our minister had us listen to the words of Martin Luther. We sat in a circle around him watching as he pulled little girls closer to him. He intoned: “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right.”4 Then he read:“Honor your father and mother so that it may go well with you and that you may enjoy long life on the earth.”5

I was taught that my parents, as well as other authoritarian figures, represented God on Earth. I was instructed to listen to them and obey their every command. We were taught part of  Luther message: “When God wants to speak with us, he does not avail himself of an angel but of parents.” We never heard the entire injunction, and so we believed our parents to be gods.6

When my parents were not at home, I was instructed to obey my uncles. They stood in for my parents as gods. The uncles were no different. They had no greater tenderness. They showed no love, no depth of feeling.

Martin Luther's <i>Small Catechism</i> (property of author)

Martin Luther’s Small Catechism (property of author)

I was ordered by my uncles to memorize every word found in Martin Luther’s Small Catechism. There remains pain thinking about my uncles. These were the same sanctified sacerdotal uncles who sexually molested me and whose behavior I was instructed to keep secret by my mother.

I dutifully followed rules set by adults in school as well. They prohibited me from reporting the people who bullied me.  When I joined other unfortunate students in catechism class, we reflected on what it would have been like to have been students in the days of Luther. I showed wood cuts of Luther’s world. We all shuddered and applied ourselves to more diligence in reading and memorizing the words of the Lutheran saint.

Those who lived in the 500+ years since Luther roamed the German forests, preached to peasants and lords telling them about the evil of Jews and Rome, I shuddered. Hate was so strong. God so cruel. There was no hope in the real world. All one could expect is a possible break in pain in the world to come.

All Lutheran children were forced to recite Luther’s Small Catechism. I diligently re-counted each answer as instructed, “What does this mean? It means we should fear and love the Lord….”

Fear and love together, I was taught, were God’s gift to man. God wanted us to love him out of fear.

<i>Spare the rod and spoil the child</i>

Spare the rod and spoil the child

If I failed to repeat that with the semblance of an earnest and forceful belief, I was promised I would feel the rod of Jesse pound against my flesh again and again until I got the message right. Jesse’s rod and I became familiarly acquainted until my uncles picked up this righteous tool of correction–then Jesse’s rod had a more bitter and painful meaning. As a child I could not run away or I would learn of Jesse’s might four-fold. Luther laid laws of faith on families, taking his cue from the embittered old epileptic that found nothing righteous in laughter or pleasure.

Martin Luther elevated “1Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. “Honor your father and mother”—which is the first commandment with a promise— “so that it may go well with you and that you may enjoy long life on the earth.”7 to a god-like ukase. Luther, my pastor, parents and uncles commanded blind love and obedience in order to reach the godhead that has the superior attributes even higher than that of a parent.Later in life, after I escape the prison of faith, I learned that this is a common psychosis among people with limited education and little opportunity to explore human behavior. In most cases, they are suppressed from conducting inquiry into the authentication of such anthropormorphization because of culture, clime, time, or religion. 8

Child abuseBy memorizing each hate-filled word I was ordered to recite found in Martin Luther’s Small Catechism I knew a modicum of peace. I obeyed my uncles even when they sexually “molested” me as I was ordered to say nothing; then, when I finally told my mother she spanked me for revealing “a dirty lie against your uncles who stand as god before you.” Adults could commit no sin. I stayed quiet by my mother, even when my uncles winked at me.

The same fear of authority prevailed in school, as most teachers went to my parents’ church.  The teachers and other adults loved Jesus so much that tears flowed when proclaiming his glory. I followed rules that made no sense in school and did not report bullies.
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3. God’s gift: fear and love

Matching the unfortunate youth who suffered from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century regurgitating Luther’s Small Catechism, I carefully intoned each stilted answer with its obligatory inquisitorial introduction: “What does this mean? It means, we should fear and love the Lord…”

Fear and love combined, I was taught, was the gift of god to man. Beating a child was biblical and my father was definitely Old Testament Biblical.9 Father’s old-time biblical literalism kept many of the congregation in check against the sin of modernism and tenderness toward children. He was like the Old Testament god of wrath who would march against sin and corruption and never yield.

<i>Whipping a child with a belt</i>

Whipping a child with a belt

Since fear and love are indeed biblical then my father was indeed a righteous man. Following “the good book”, Herbert would sometimes beat me until I could barely walk as long as mother and the other siblings were not at home. If they were there or entered later, he beat me only until I stopped crying: a promise to Richard and Mary that they, too, must obey or suffer the wrath of god.

Father did not tire of disciplining a wayward child. Even when his belt grew hot, he continued. If he had enough and the spittle spat from his mouth contorted with raw rage, he would throw me against a wall or to the cold cement floor of the basement. Sometimes he would push me out of the house.

Herbert Ide found his spiritual reward, and his psychological satisfaction, assured when he died. He had become wealthy. To show his election, Herb left $1 million to his beloved Ascension Lutheran church.10 He left  his family nothing but the bruises. While his first wife, my mother, and his daughter and youngest son were invited to the funeral, I was “overlooked.”

I received a photocopy of the death notice from a woman I did not know. It told me of the wake and burial plans. I went that night to Garden of Memories funeral home–to make sure he was dead. For some unknown reason, I went to the funeral the next day–but sat at the back of the church while the minister told everyone how my father mowed the expansive yard every Sunday. Herb was well known.

Before I could leave, a cousin sat down beside me. She insisted that I go with her to the luncheon. I never understood why food was served at a funeral. We chatted quietly–and then I never heard from her again.

To bequeath that million dollars, Herb Ide saved from the beginning of his adult life. After marrying the first time, he stole his children’s pig money, confiscated meager amounts we earned from the sale of newspapers, all-occasion cards, mowing lawns and making potholders and put in piggy banks—all carefully saved and treasured. He told us that he was going to invest it for us—in his extremely small string of Ide Hardware stores numbering two: in Nashua and Dennison.

Herb Ide saw himself as the Creator—of prosperity—as if he was Nicodemus–or Mitt Romney. He had told me sixty years earlier he was a Republican as it was the party of the rich. He ordered me to vote as he set the example, as the GOP was God’s Own Party.

Customers of the perennial salesman fared no better than his children. He cheated them, ensuring his righteousness, Herb’s generosity and Christianity were ever-enshrined by his minister, congregation, God, and Jesus, he claimed.

Herb laid up no treasures on earth in quest of opening and being enriched by heaven’s treasury. He did not return any more than Jesus had promised 2000+ years ago that he would return. Herb died like all people. There was no glow of an afterlife on his face when placed in his coffin. The Sheol of the ancient Jews seemed more realistic than the platitudes of paradise preached from pulpits.

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4. Living Biblical Literalism

<Prosperity Gospel>

Dedicated to Biblical literalism, my biological father bought his place in heaven in the same way that he bought his cemetery lots: one extra for good measure while two of the six will never be used. Herb was not “laying up treasures on earth” but gave them to heaven and its god who needed the money worse than his family: “19 “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. 20 But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. 21 For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”11 Like Joel Olsteen and the Koch Brothers, Herbert’s religion was the gospel of prosperity. He joined every religious movement that promised to make him richer than he was.

As intolerant as the Jesus of Matthew 10:34, my father wanted to follow Jesus to meet the call to be with Jesus. He coupled his own commitment by demanding that everyone else also follow his Jesus or not eat at his table. Herbert repetitiously reminded his family “St. Paul states that the father was the ambassador of Jesus and ruled the house for Jesus as a god.” It is biblical in a corrupt way, but father never really read the Bible. He only read the verses that pleased him like all evangelical extremists.12
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5. Mistake of questioning god-fearing parents.

When I questioned the reasoning of my parents, I was told not only that I had broken the Fourth Commandment and was charged with writing out Martin Luther’s definition of that commandment on love 100 times by printing, but chastised with a whip of words that stung my young mind: “You are not thinking like Jesus.” If I did not learn, I was reminded, I would earn retribution until I could not sit. I had large savings in this bank of brutality. My father began making regular contribution on a nearly daily basis. With each coin of agony ledgered to my account, I grew to hate him more. I did not speak. I did not tell him. I could not afford any more charges against my eternal pain.

I was hit frequently for questioning my parents. They told me that Jesus never questioned his parents, or his parents would have the right to hit him or do worse. My only comfort afforded to me by my parents was a Bible given to me for graduation from Zion Lutheran Church. This Bible, did not give me the same answers and I became more confused and lost, and wanted strongly to end my existence since hell could be no worse.

In Luke I found that Jesus did question his parents: “Why were you searching for me?” he asked. “Didn’t you know I had to be in my Father’s house?”13 Of course I know now that the passage is not an original statement, but gleaned from the Prophets: “I delight to do your will, O my God: yes, your law is within my heart.”14 and “Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before.”15 being a later redaction from an eighth century marginalia in an effort to prove that the prophecy of the past was fulfilled.16 Still it made Jesus a bit more human and not the stuffy and ossified biblical orangutan that lumbered through the Holy Land condemning any happiness children could experience.

Once I was quite brave. I was quickly quite sorry for that bravery.  Believing I was equal to my parents in the eye of the Constitution (but not in the eye or law of the Bible or religion) I declared that I saw no purpose in attending a building called a church. I noted that Jesus had said “where two or three are gathered in my name, there I am with you also.” Regally, my religious father rejected that as being applicable only to prisoners and elderly. Then, as had become customary and expected, I was told “You are not thinking like Jesus.”

I was slapped across the ear each time I volunteered an opinion. Still young and  naïve, I retorted with Bible in hand that I could only find two times when Jesus visited the Temple. A second cuffing that left a ringing in my ear for weeks was my reward when I complained that there is no record of Jesus visiting a synagogue or other house of worship during his life. While my father removed his belt to “throttle me good” he invoked the name of Jesus and spoke as an ancient prophet promising perdition to people who did not follow the letter of the law that a prophet alone knew. I laughed, unthinkingly, as he split infinitives and bankrupted grammatical word order in his divorcement from reality. As he beat me, Herbert assured me that Jesus went daily to his house of prayer in Jerusalem and since he stood in the place of Jesus on earth it was my lot to obey or leave. There is no record of Jesus having a house, or even an apartment in Jerusalem, or in any city he visited including cities that did not exist but were made up by scriptorium that wanted to prove that the Jesus of the Gospels that were written after the Epistles was the messiah foretold and the one who would fulfill prophesy.
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6. Rebellion

When I rebelled against my parents, I was warned “You are not thinking like Jesus.” When I struck back, kicking Herbert in the ankles with increasing vigor and force as he began to beat me more times than I can remember in the basement of “his home” on Tucson Drive in Cedar Falls, I was reminded that the fires of hell were waiting for me. “Jesus never rebelled against his father,” Herbert pontificated, making sure he had uttered “father” and not accidentally used the plural: parents. For that claim my father made about Jesus, I found no biblical support. I stayed silent to protect myself, as now I was afraid of every word that allegedly was drawn from the Bible. There was little comfort in knowing that the verbosity of the enraged man beating me had as little knowledge of his Bible as the writers of the Synoptic Gospels had of Mark that each, allegedly, and wrongly, was patterned after.

Jesus rebelled on several occasions against his parents. He disappeared in the Temple and sat to listen to rabbis (not to his parents). Jesus rejected his parents’ admonitions and entreaties when they found their son among the rabbis.17 Jesus even questioned who his family was.18 That seemed to be the bravest thing a child could do to me and I wanted to deny my parents. Jesus only recognized them when he was ready. This was the case even when Jesus is reputed to have come to the moment when he would die. The man from Galilee recognized only his mother and his best friend from the cross.19 He declared Mary and John to be a family20—a most non-traditional family that would have upset Maggie Gallagher.

Finding in the Jesus of the New Testament a fighter, I found the fortitude and courage to challenge my father’s mangled mantel of authority. At last, when I was ordered to recite the Fourth Commandment that I had grown to despise, I stood straight and spoke sharply spitting sourly each worthless word wretched from my throat: “Honor your mother so it is well with you.”21 Of course that brought the whipping anticipated by both of us, but I felt avenged. My ultimate moment of mirth and anticipation occurred when I was finally pushed out of the house and family that had no interest in me from that day to now.

Before I left, while still too young for college but forced to take lodging in a one room flat on Iowa street in a dilapidated house that had only a window to the outdoors to use as a bathroom, I began to experience “sinful feelings with which the Devil betrays men”22 (I pondered, the Devil does not like women or just does not betray them?) and so I asked about sex. I was cautioned “You are not thinking like Jesus.”
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7. Sex and Jesus

I never was told about sex, but did find a sex encyclopedia in my mother’s closet. Evangelical hide a lot of different items in their closets, but all get finger marked or have the most unusual smell and color. The photographs, aged and stained, were exciting. I did not feel so odd. By the time I was 13, I knew Jesus masturbated—at least the Jesus that let a man rest on his head on the chest of Jesus23—as I experienced my own resurrection whenever someone put his or her head on my chest—or further south. In finally understood what my Iowa KKK classmates meant when they talked about “the South is rising again.”
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7a. Sex, Sin and Psychology

I wanted to be a good Lutheran Christian. I did not look at women: not their feet, their breasts, nor their hair. I ran away from the prettiest girl I knew at Iowa State Teachers College when she touched me. I wanted to be like Jesus. I knew nothing about sex, as mother told me it was the path to hell, and my father bellowed that sex was reserved exclusively for marriage between one man and one woman. The more I read the Bible, I never did find that wonderfully save married couple.

The Old Testament spoke of polygamy and incest: Isaac married his first cousin Rebekah24 and his son, Jacob, married his first two cousins (Leah and Rachel, some scrolls have the cousins defined as sisters).25 Abraham married his sister Sarah,26 Caleb gave his daughter Achsah to his brother’s son Othniel,27 David had eight wives and a harem,28 and Solomon had 700 wives and 300 concubines.29

Why was there no record of Jesus having a girl friend, dating, or being married? Maybe his Heavenly Father had not told him of his Father’s plan that each male must marry one female and have lots of children. Maybe, oh the horror of it all! Jesus’ Heavenly Father forgot to tell him about sex and how a man had a stick to put into a woman’s hole—as Randy at Cedar Falls Public High School told me after he showed me a picture of two men kissing. Randy never told me why he had that picture—he only said it was the image of sin.

Reflecting on my own absences of sex knowledge until I was in college, I often wondered what Jesus did when he had “sinful thoughts” or “felt the devil rise up in his loins” as my parents prattled past bedtime so all such musings disappeared. I knew, early in my life, that what my father said was the opposite of what he did—but he was an adult and therefore not a hypocrite but a careful judge of what Jesus would permit.
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7b. Masturbation

<i>A satyr masturbating (Greek krater, 6th century BCE) Crátera ática de columnas (M.A.N. 1999-99-65)</i>

A satyr masturbating (Greek krater, 6th century BCE) Crátera ática de columnas (M.A.N. 1999-99-65)

Later, when investigating the sex life of Jesus, I had a startling revelation. I knew that masturbation was a key ingredients or action in numerous ancient religions.  In ancient Egypt, Atom created the universe and people by masturbating. Pan was the god of masturbation in ancient Greece, and the act was celebrated depicting satyrs on plates, vases, and walls. Jesus said nothing about sex: heterosexual, bisexual, and not even homosexual—except once, and I found out later that the story was added hundreds of years after Jesus allegedly died. The only time Jesus, allegedly condemned sex, was in the instances of adultery. Even adultery was seldom mentioned.

<i>God and masturbation</i>

God and masturbation

The only reference to sex appeared in one of the most erotic books of the Torah: the Old Testament. I was told, by both of my parents that it was about masturbation. It was such a grievous sin that it demanded god’s attention and exercise of enforcing a death penalty that was not written.30 It was oral tradition.

This evil crime of masturbation condemned Onan to death by an unforgiving god that had a penis and testicles even though there is no Biblical reference he ever used them. Onan’s crime was: “Onan knew that the seed should not be his; and it came to pass, when he went in unto his brother’s wife, that he spilled it on the ground, lest that he should give seed to his brother”. Onan masturbated, I was told. The text does not detail any manual manipulation of an aroused penis—it merely states that “he spilled it on the ground” that was more like coitus interruptus.31 He either pulled his penis out at time of ejaculation or was not excited enough to penetrate his brother’s widow vagina and so “spilled it (his sperm) on the ground.” The passage has nothing to do with bisexuality nor even homosexuality contrary to evangelical extremists.32 Male homosexuality is not even mentioned in Leviticus.33

Ancient civilizations only banned passive homosexuality as passivity was considered effeminate. The laws said nothing about lesbianism. Women were expected to be passive. 34

Patriarchy quickly removed any symbolism of femininity: beards were ordered for men who were to be saved,35 women had to “cover themselves modestly”36 and food was to be regulated, kosher (כַּשְׁרוּת), and distasteful.37

Neither sex sin made sense at my young age.38 I was too young to worry about masturbating or homosexuality. My time was spent fending off an uncle’s “advances” when I visited my grandmother’s farm in the summer. Grandma never understood why I begged to stay up late with her listening to the radio—and only reluctantly accepted her final warning of “Git to bed! Now!” I knew my uncle was waiting for me under the sheets.
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7c. Impure thoughts

While I thought both acts were wrong based on my readings in the Old Testament—readings that used to make me ashamed to admit in the past that they stimulated me into contriving “impure thoughts” that I would later confess to a priest after I converted to Roman Catholicism, as only in the confessional could I tell the truth that I found the Bible to be erotica—I still kept hoping as perspiration dripped from my forehead that my uncle would be asleep, and became more agitated realizing that Jesus was watching me. Falling asleep was seldom my good fortune as if I tried to sleep my uncle was busy preying39 for me as he whispered the “sins of the heart”40 that he seemed to know better than I. I never told my grandmother—not since the upbraiding I had from my mother who denounced me for such a “scandalous accusation” when my uncle “read his Bible religious every day.”
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7d. Adultery

I wondered about the women that my father met and with whom he became friends. He worked late at night, for the family I was told. I did not question it until he married shortly after my mother divorced him. I thought it seemed in haste, and kept that opinion. My mother remarried 25 years later, convinced even on the night of her second marriage that she was breaking the laws of her god since she was divorced.41 Mother reiterated what she assumed Jesus said: “I tell you that anyone who divorces his wife, except for marital unfaithfulness, and marries another woman commits adultery.”42. Mother was not the adulteress. Based on the words written in the fourth century,43 mother believed it was her lot in life to live alone—and to be miserable.

There were whispers about my father and “that McGue woman”. I had no idea about what was happening, and turning to scripture I discovered that Jesus never said anything about men and women being together at any time or at any place. I ignored it.

People talked behind hands about adultery. Some said Herbert was an adulterer. But there was no penalty for the man—as the man was always the surrogate for god. Only woman could commit adultery I was told—and only a woman caught in adultery was ever lectured by Jesus.

<i>Jesus and the woman caught in adultery</i>

Jesus and the woman caught in adultery

Decades later I learned that the woeful tribulations of adultery were added and not original to any Gospel, unless the preacher was an evangelical fire-breathing preacher. Even the “Woman Caught in Adultery” was an “add-on” not being original at all, but purloined from older more erotic literature, but incorporated to give the merciless Jesus a bit of humanity in forgiving a natural act.44

I was always interested in adultery and the Bible. My father “frequented” many women. He even had one over to the house while my mother worked and he assumed I was in school. Mother  said she knew nothing about it, and that I was saying bad things about her husband. I still remember her face when she learned that Herbert married “that woman” with unnecessary haste. He had told mother he wanted a divorce and not separate maintenance as he did not want to support a dead cow. He wanted to calf.
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7e. Rhythm and babies

My father told me that “spaced” sex, or the rhythm method, was all that his god would permit—and only after marriage. There was no question it had to be between one man and one woman—married for life. That was a common belief in the 1940s and it continued its strangle hold on society in the USA for decades long after I was a grown man. Any other form of sexuality, especially masturbation would bring down the wrath of god and the masturbator would be struck dead like Onan in Genesis. I was terrified of sex—even to practicing religious roulette.45 It was the commandment from Jesus, himself, I was taught. To do otherwise would invite the hatred of god and son upon the sexual sinner. Jesus hated the sinner and the sin. And there were so many sins it was difficult to catalog all much less keep from the path of unrighteousness. When I told my mother about this dalliance, she was furious and told me to say nothing as it was obvious to her that I was lying. When it came to her court divorce and I was called to the stand, these incidents I was required to tell to the judge—and in part, it was my testimony that not only ostracized me from the family, but also won for my mother her divorce but without alimony and only child support. Still, mother lamented, I had betrayed Jesus and was instrumental in pushing her into a divorce. Repeatedly I was informed, “Jesus will never forgive you as he has an eye on everyone.” I imagined a god with more than 100 billion eyes.
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7f. Sex only in everlasting marriage

I was glad to know about this, although I found this “stinky balloon” in the garage and assume that someone had tried to create a stink bomb—until I watched my father usher out a woman who would later be his wife, and toss another of those deflated objects toward the car. My mother would not hear of it. She “married for life” as Jesus commanded. When I asked her why Jesus never married, her response was even more startling. My mother moaned in a trembling voice: “Jesus was a good man.” Subconsciously she was flaying herself with the unspoken words: “I am a bad woman”. I understood at that point that good men did not marry. But why? That sealed our separation, one finalized when she called me after her second husband died, telling me never to contact her again. It was as stinging and when she remonstrated against me for trying to surprise her as a small child with a hug and a kiss.

My mother turned against me when I acted without thinking–for not following Jesus as she knew he always thought before doing or saying anything. She reminded me of what my brother and I did at least twenty years before she committed the unforgivable sin of remarrying.

My brother, who was 1.5 years younger, and I were playing on the floor of the kitchen, while mother was making cookies. We whispered that we should hug her and we might get a cookie in return. Jumping up and running to her, we threw our 5- and 7-year old arms around her to tell her we loved her, but she stung back with a charge neither of us understood. She shouted “rape” and father stormed in. Of course, it was my fault as I was older, so I was sent to the damp basement to sleep and Richard got the entire bed on the first (and only) floor. I had become the devil that tempted Jesus.

Trying to explain our actions, I made things worse. Richard sided with mother and said I did not pray at night. He forgot to mention that he did not pray, either. That was the death sentence, and it became a most grievous charge when I audaciously articulated that Jesus said to pray in a closet in secret. Mother would have none of that as she “knew” what I was doing in the closet, retorting angrily, “You are not like Jesus—you are to respect me, not love me.” Then she hit the hardest salvo, and warned me I would be struck dead as was Onan “who spilled his seed upon the ground.” Onan kept coming back into her conversations meant to correct me, and I never knew why as I gave up that solitary vice for fear of family spying.

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8. Children force adults into pedophile actions

When I asked what that meant, she hit me and told me not to be coy and she knew I was practicing the Devil’s daily dungeon exercise.  It still made no sense, but Jesus would forgive me in time if I never touched anyone or myself again. Two of my uncles did, and I was age 7. I told my mother, and she told me I had betrayed my uncles as they were testing me for Jesus. I was accused of the crime of sinfully entrapping adult males who were studying for the clergy.  Clergymen, I was told so many times as if it was a class in memorizing the will of god, never had impure thoughts or immodest deeds.  When a child betrayed a man of god and forced the man of god to engage in any sexual act, it was “the devil working in the child as all children are born into sin.”  As “King David” was alleged to have written in poetry in Psalm 51:5:

Surely I was sinful at birth,
    sinful from the time my mother conceived me.

I was beaten again. From that point on any form of sexuality became repugnant. I remained a virgin until I was 27. Sex really was not that bad. What I lost I did not miss. I gained a new world view.
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8a. Sworn to secrecy to protect pastors

Mother forbade me from telling anyone what happened as she knew it was a lie. My uncles were studying to be pastors. They would be good men. I was the one who was evil. Of course, mother had the support of god, his son Jesus, and her husband who beat me for touching myself in an impure manner, although I never did as it did not make sense. Besides, I reasoned, I always washed my hands before I ate, changed my clothes, or went to bed.

As with the Ludders (the original spelling of Martin’s surname) in sixteenth century Thuringia, the rod was not far from father’s grasp. It was not spared as I was termed spoiled, and it was applied lavishly and welts rose and blood came to the fore.

Like young Martin Luther, I “felt ugly toward” my father. Another sin. It seemed right to me, however, as even Jesus expressed hatred for others. When I questioned  the preacher at Trinity Lutheran why he never spoke about this, he warned me never to read that part of the Bible. It was the Devil talking. Father heard about my indiscretion. The faithful rod of Jesse that father used, unlike the rod my uncles applied to my backside, came out and Law of God was repeated with every blow. That time torture was accepted as it was when the last iota of respect or affection I had for my father melted away as the summer sun blasted through the clouds to warm the rich Iowa soil and raise corn for cattle and sweet corn for the saved. I soon forgot what sweet corn tasted like.
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8b. Rod of Jesse and Staff of Life

When my father learned what his brother had done, it was declared a “just verdict of the Most High”. My uncle, studying for the pastorate, was not denounced since he was administering the “punishment of god”. The rod of Jesse was a common tool to bring salvation to sinners in the Bible, with the just judgment of god clearly stated in Isaiah 13:16: “Their infants will be dashed to pieces before their eyes; their houses will be looted and their wives ravished.”46

When I protested that my mother had said such action was immoral and against Jesus, I was reprimanded for listening to her and not coming to my father who was Jesus on earth. When I argued that I had tried, he told me that my “instrument” was not for pleasure but the Staff of Life that gave life and could only be used to bring new souls into the world so they could suffer and be renewed, born again, and feel the resurrection soaring hot threw “their sinews.” This made no sense, but I was ordered to obey in the same manner as Jesus was “subject to” his parents.

Being told that my uncles did no wrong as they were “men of god”, I would not be quite. When I told my father I hated him, I was rejected with the vocal ejaculation levied at me by my father, “You do not imitate Jesus.” I had memorized those words and knew them well.

When I interrogated my Sunday school teacher, I was damned with the draconian declarative: “You are not thinking or acting like Jesus.” What little love I had for this paragon of virtue melted like an ice cube on a metal tray set in the rays of an August sun. I gave up going to church and praying. Instead of wasting my time listening to others read to me, I read more about the god my family claimed to worship.  God the Father, the impregnator of Mary was there in blood stained robes of his Holocausts, mired in hate, bitterness, and abuse. This was the progenitor pushing perdition past personal limits and becoming the instrument to punish the young who were left to repopulate the word–but none who survived Noah’s flood were young! God transmogrified from a loving father into a vile, vitriol-laced, violent demon.

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9. Becoming disillusioned with Jesus — and god

When I denied the existence of god, I was condemned “You are not thinking like Jesus. He recognized his Father in heaven.” What they fire branded me with was not the Jesus I discovered in my Lutheran bible. I saw a lot of me in the Jesus of the New Testament and a lot of Jesus in me and that made me afraid. When I suggested that the Jesus I had discovered was real and the church’s interpretation did not match scripture, I was told to read deeper. I was “encouraged” (by a naked, raw and over-used belt strap suitably applied to my rump and back was a great teacher) to delve into in the Epistles to discover the real Jesus who created his church on earth.

9a. Epistles of Paul detailing the life and ministry of Jesus

I never could find the biblical Jesus of my parent’s church. Even when I read and reread and reread yet again and again the infamous Epistles attributed to an epileptic who took a new name, Paul, I found nothing about Jesus’ life, friendship, family relations, or anything even close to a hint of a man called Jesus. Pathetically, Paul knew very little about the man Jesus.

The former “persecutor” shows no familiarity with the Gospels.  It testifies that they were written after the Epistles, most of them ascribed to his authorship, but the hand changes, word choice is muted, there is no record that Saul/Paul knew Syriac in the Gospel of John, and internal evidence shows that Paul’s Epistles were written after he died: from 80/90 – 450f.

The Epistles were written at the end of the first century and into the second century. Even the authors of Paul’s letters, admit that what Paul/the Pauline scriptorium knew “was passed on” and without reliability:47For what I received I passed on to you as of first importance: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas48 and then to the Twelve. After that, he appeared to more than five hundred of the brothers and sisters at the same time, most of whom are still living, though some have fallen asleep. Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles, and last of all he appeared to me also, as to one abnormally born.”49

Additional information disproving the order of writing is found in references to later generations that refer to as make claim to Jesus, but the name “Jesus” is never used, although “Christ” appears.50 Saul/Paul does state that Jesus was raised from the dead but none of the epistles ascribed to the Persecutor mention prophesy being fulfilled or even suggest that three days being the time of internment.

Even more surprising in an age clamoring for something to believe in, Saul/Paul makes no reference to post-resurrection appearances of “the Crucified”. There are no statements on the crucifixion only that Christ was crucified.51 More incriminating is the lack of evidence at the Nazareth site. At best a few lamps have been found. The other discoveries have a paucity of support as what was unearthed shows marks that it was carried there by Roman troops and those heading for bigger communities.52

Missing the critical eye of the redactors at Nicaea when the Emperor Constantine I created his “catholic (universal) church” is the foundation for one of the greatest heresies in early Christianity. Saul/Paul was the first to preach this heresy. It was known as: Adoptionism, and it is Biblical.

Adoptionism declared that Jesus was a man adopted by God. Its foundation is in a Letter many today consider spurious but a letter the early church used. The critical line is: “In the same way, Christ did not take on himself the glory of becoming a high priest. But God said to him,

“You are my Son;
today I have become your Father.”53

The heart of the controversy was not even caught by the Emperor nor by his retaining bishops. Saul/Paul’s Letter to the Hebrews still demands serious investigation and research.54 Saul/Paul offers no parables of the sheep and the goats, or the prodigal son, or the rich man and Lazarus, or the lost sheep, or the good Samaritan. There is no Jesus as teacher at all in Paul. In fact, the authors of Paul reject miracles and other fetes. Paul does not even imagine an earthly Jesus, but writes: “Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom, but we preach Christ crucified: a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles.”55

Outside of musings about what Paul considered to be the goals and demands and commands of the man from Nazareth—a man I lost faith in when quite young, even after laborious reading desperate to prove that Jesus existed as most of my early books56 and theses57 were on Jesus and Christian apologists and Roman Catholic dogma–I discovered that the preacher’s Jesus could not have been real.

My epiphany began when I studied ancient Biblical maps. Nazareth58 is more legend than fact.

The earliest non-scriptural reference to the town, a citation by Sextus Julius Africanus dated about 221 CE.[58 Eusebius Pamphili, Ecclesiastical History, 1,vii, § 14.] Even the Gospels do not agree, with Matthew (2:19-23) claiming that Nazareth was the home village of Mary where she was “visited” by an angel, while Luke claims (1:26) that they moved there after fleeing Bethlehem for Egypt, and where the people wanted to kill Jesus by throwing him off a cliff (4:29).

The more I read, the more I realized these, too, were stories plagiarized from far older accounts. Not only was Sarah visited by three “angels”59 The three are the ancient Egyptian trinity.] After their visit Sarah was pregnant. 60 From this union Nazareth was to have had its beginning.  The problem is that the name of the alleged community does not appear on any map during the life and ministry of Jesus during in the first century CE. Were they wrong?

How could Jesus be from a city called Nazareth when there was no historic Nazareth when Jesus was supposed to have lived. Nazareth is mentioned nowhere in the Old Testament, not even by Joshua who records twelve town and six villages–but no Nazareth. Worse, there was not even a military outpost called Nazareth.61

<i>4th century Roman map of Judea and no Nazareth</i>

4th century Roman map of Judea and no Nazareth

The Talmud mentions no Nazareth, nor does any ancient historian or geographer or cartographer. Saul/Paul says nothing about it, and gives no reference to a Jesus of Nazareth. It is a hoax invented in the fourth century.  At best it might have been an obscure hamlet of less than 300 people–and that is where Jesus spent the first thirty years of his life? That by itself dilutes the entire Annunciation fable as if a young virgin had truly been “visited” (the word means sexual intercourse) by an “angel” (messenger), and had become pregnant, the entire village would have known–and violently disapproved.  Even the writers of the Gospel of John decry the existence of Nazareth by questioning “can anything good come out of Nazareth?”62 The authors of Matthew state the reason the fiction of Nazareth was given life: it fulfill the prophecy of old:”and he went and lived in a town called Nazareth. So was fulfilled what was said through the prophets, that he would be called a Nazarene.”63–but there is no such prophecy. Not one of the writers of the Old Testament books made such a ludicrous claim. The line is another late edition commanded to further support the emperor’s church and religion. The expression ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ is actually a bad translation of the original Greek transliterated as Jesous o Nazoraios (Ιησούς από τη Ναζαρέτ) coming from Jesus the Nazarene: Ιησούς ο Ναζωραίος,64  being on par with most undergraduate translation courses in Third World nations for-profit universities.
.

Reality and facts are confusing when reading the Bible. The more I read outside of the Bible, the less plausible, believable, and accurate the Bible became. For those who would see, the Bible’s internal errors became clear. The clearer the errors of the Bible, the more I began to doubt Jesus and Christianity, and the more I began to believe in myself, my powers of reasoning and analysis. A weight was being lifted from shoulders crippled by the Epistles and Gospels, by the readings and sermons of pastors and priests. A new freedom was emerging. The question remained: who was this multiple-Janus-faced Jesus? Was he real? Was I like him?
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Bibliography

Bible (Judaea-Christian) various editions and translations, languages.

Burton, Henry (1660). Jesu-vvorship confuted, or Certain arguments against bowing at the name Jesus: proving to be idolatrous and superstitious and so utterly unlawful: with objections to the contrary fully answered. London, England: Printed for H. G. ….

Cadbury, Henry J. (1917, July 3). “A Possible Case of Lukan Authorship (John 7:53-8:11)” Harvard Theological Review, Vol. 10 No. 03: 237-244.

Carruth, Shawn; Robinson, James McConkey; Heil, Christoph (1996). Q 4:1-13,16: the temptations of Jesus : Nazara. East Walpole, MA. USA: Peeters Publishers. p. 415.

Codex Bezae (late 4th or early 5th century).

Codex Fuldensis (positively dated to 546).

Codex Sinaiticus (4th century).

Codex Vaticanus (4th? century).

Colwell, Ernest Cadman (1935, April 1). Book review: “Recent Developments in the Textual Criticism of the Greek Bible”. Classical Philology, Vol. 30 No. 2: 188-189.

Dening, Sarah. The Mythology of Sex. London, UK: Macmillian 1996.

Ehrman, Bart D. (2012). Did Jesus exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth. New York, NY, USA: HarperOne.

Evans, C. Stephen (1996). The historical Christ and the Jesus of faith: the incarnational narrative as history. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.

Eusebius Pamphili (4th century). Ecclesiastical History.

Evans, Craig A & Sanders, James A. (1998). The Function of Scripture in early Jewish and Christian Tradition. Sheffield, UK, Sheffield Academic Press.

Hughes, Kyle R. (2013). “The Lukan Special Material and the Tradition History of the Pericope Adulterae,” Novum Testamentum 55.3: 232-251.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (1968). “An Apology for the Petrine Doctrine” (Unpublished MA thesis) Cedar Falls, IA, USA: University of Northern Iowa.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (1973), “This Cup Shall Not Pass Away” An Historical Study of the development of Thomas Becket’s attitude toward his own death.  (Unpublished Ph.D. thesis) Pittsburgh, PA, USA: Carnegie-Mellon University.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (1984). The Teachings of Jesus on Women. Dallas, TX, USA: Texas Independent Press.

Ide, Arthur Frederick  (1984). Jews, Jesus & woman in the apostolic age : with a synopsis, parallel translation & critical commentary on New Testament references to women in the life & ministry of Jesus Christ and the apostleship He commissioned women to join. Mesquite, TX, USA: IHP.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (1985). God’s girls : ordination of women in the early Christian & Gnostic churches. Garland, TX, USA: Tangelwüld, 1986, ©1985.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (1991). Zoar and her Sisters: Homosexuality, the Bible & Jesus Christ. Oak Cliff, TX, USA: Minuteman Press.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (1993). Catechism of Family Values based on the BibleArlington, TX, USA : Liberal Arts Press.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (1999). The Resurrection : an analysis of the Gospels, writings of St. Paul, and historical records. Chicago, IL, USA: Sepore.

Ide, Arthur Frederick (2004). Crucifixion: What the Bible Really Says. Chicago, IL: Sepore.

Kippley, J. F. (1977). “A more optimistic look at the birth control statistics” The CCL {Couple-to-Couple} Newsletter. November-December 4(3):159.

Lanner, Laurel (1992). “Who Will Lament Her?”: the Feminine and the Fantastic in the Book of Nahum. Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies. London, UK: Continuum International Publishing Group. Vol. 434. Playing the Texts, Vol. 11.

Lex Scantinia

Luther, Martin. Dr. Martin Luthers Catechism, Philadelphia, PA, USA: Printed by John Geyer, reprint 1807.

Luther, Martin. “Gospel Sermon for the Second Sunday in Advent, on Luke 21:25–33”, paragraphs 49–50. Luther’s Works (Church Postil 1.) Vol. 75 © 2013. St. Louis, MO, USA: Concordia Publishing House.

Luther, Martin (1529). Kleine Katechismus.

Mason, Diane Elizabeth (2008). The Secret Vice: Masturbation in Victorian fiction and medical culture. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press.

McMichael, Steven J. / de Espina, Alphonso (1994). Was Jesus of Nazareth the Messiah? Alphonos de Espina’s argument against the Jews in the Fortalitium fidei (c. 1464). Atlanta, GA, USA: Scholars Press.

Metzger, Bruce (1971). A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament. Stuttgart, Deutschland: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, pp. 187-189.

Ochs, Christoph (2013). “Matthaeus Adversus Christianos: the use of the Gospel of Matthew in Jewish polemics against the divinity of Jesus.” Unpublished thesis (Ph.D.) University of Nottingham; Nottingham, UK: University of Nottingham. Reissued in the series Wissenshaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. 2 Reihem 350.

Priestley, Joseph (1783). A general view of the arguments for the unity of God and against the divinity and pre-eistence of Christ, from reason, from scriptures, and fromhistory. Birmingham, (England): Printed by Piercy and Jones, for J. Johnson.

Qur’an (various editions, years; all in Arabic).

Raterman, Herbert J. (1971). Charity and Sex and the Young Man: Some thoughts on the Proper Attitude about Sex: God’s viewpoint; mortal sin and sexual temptations of young men; Masturbation. Cincinnati, OH, USA: self published.

Shaeffer, Robert (1991). The Making of the Messiah: Christianity and Resentment. Buffalo, NY, USA: Prometheus Books.

Shtulman, Andrew (2008, September). “Variation in the anthropomorphization of supernatural beings and its implications for cognitive theories of religion.” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Vol. 34(5): 1123-1138.

Tabor, James D. (2012). Paul and Jesus: How the Apostle Transformed Christianity. New York, NY, USA: Simon & Schuster.

Tissot, S. A. D. (1767). Thoughts on the Sin of Onan: chiefly Extracted from a late Writer. London,UK: (s.n.).

Tregelles, Samuel Prideaux (1856). An Introduction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of the Holy Scripture. London, England: Wertheim & Macintosh, pp. 465-468.

Van Driel, Mels & Vincent, Paul (2013). With the Hand: a History of Masturbation. London, UK: Reaktion Books.

Welton, Thurston S. (1960). Rhythm birth control: the modern method of birth control. New York, NY, USA: Grosset & Dunlap.

Wienholtz, William F. (1951). An interpretation of the Fall of Man: Psychological remifications of Masturbation and the concept of Original Sin. New York, NY, USA: William-Frederick Press.

Witherington III, Ben (1995). The Jesus quest: the Third Search for the Jew of Nazareth. Downers Grove, IL, USA: InterVarsity Press.

Youngblood, Ronald (1994). “Counting the Ten Commandments”, Biblical Review, December.

Zimondi, Annette Grace (2004). “The prophet Jeremiah and the queen of heaven.” Unpublished thesis (M.A. in religion) Nashville, TN, USA: Vanderbilt University.

 
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End Notes

 

  1. Proverbs 13:24: “Whoever spares the rod hates their children, but the one who loves their children is careful to discipline them.” Luther later defended parental actions: “We must, therefore impress it upon the young that they should regard their parents as in God’s stead, and remember that however lowly, poor, frail, and queer they may be, nevertheless they are father and mother given them by God. They are not to be deprived of their honor because of their conduct or their failings.” Luther, Martin (reprint 1807). Large Catechism, Philadelphia, PA, USA: Printed by John Geyer; Part First, Fourth Commandment: p. 565.
  2. Luke 14:16.
  3. 1 John 3:15
  4. Ephesians 6:1.
  5. Ephesians 6:3.
  6. The full quote is: When God wants to speak with us, he does not avail himself of an angel but of parents, or the pastor, or of the neighbor: wenn Gott will, zu sprechen und sich mit uns, hat er sich nicht in Anspruch nehmen, sondern ein Engel der Eltern, oder dem Pfarrer oder der Nachbar.Luther, Martin (1529). Kleine Katechismus, English quote at: http://www.quotes.net/quote/15295.
  7. Ephesians 6:1-3. The third verse is plagiarized word for word from Deuteronomy 5:16. It should be recalled that Deuteronomy is a hybrid word coming from the Greek Δευτερονόμιο Deuteronomion that literally means “second law”: it is from δεύτερο:deuteros “second” + νόμο: nomos “law”, that was a careless and uncorrected mistranslation of the Hebrew עותקשלחוקזה mishneh hattorah hazzoth “a copy of this law.” The book is a repetition, with comments, of the Decalogue—all three different sets in the Old Testament—and most of the laws of Exodus. Martin Luther also plagiarized Deuteronomy and gave it his own interpretation: an act that was rejected in the Law.
  8. Cf. Shtulman, Andrew (2008, September). “Variation in the anthropormorphization of supernatural beings and its implications for cognitive theories of religion.” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Vol. 34(5): 1123-1138.
  9. Acts 17:11, 2 Timothy 1:7. This is rejected by 1 John 4:18, giving suspect to authorships of the competing documents. Deuteronomy 8:6 is rejected by 11:1. Martin Luther based his argument for joining fear and love on the concept that each Christian is both saint and sinner (simil iustus et peccator). Luther argued that Fear should drive us to seek such love and pray God for it. Luther, Martin. “Gospel Sermon for the Second Sunday in Advent, on Luke 21:25–33”, paragraphs 49–50. Luther’s Works (Church Postil 1.) Vol. 75 © 2013. St. Louis, MO, USA: Concordia Publishing House.
  10. http://wcfcourier.com/news/local/million-bequest-to-aid-valley-lutheran/article_a5731d24-01e6-11df-95ca-001cc4c002e0.html.
  11. Matthew 6:19-21.
  12. Herb never acknowledged reading Revelation 21:2, Isaiah 54:5, Colossians 3:18, or Ephesians 5:22-23. None of these injunctions were meant universally as each letter was written to a distinctive and separate community that was not in communication with others, and were separated by time and distance.
  13. Luke 2:49.
  14. Psalm 40:8.
  15. Malachi 3:1.
  16. On the development and importance of marginalia, read: http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/educator/modules/gutenberg/invention/marginalia/. Cp. for marginalia’s influence on biblical writing at http://maskilledawid.wordpress.com/2009/07/17/biblical-marginalia-2/. A section on inventing faith using marginalia in this series appears later.
  17. Luke 2:39-52.
  18. Matthew 12:48.
  19. John 19:25.
  20. John 19:26.
  21. Exodus 20:12 is the most common version, but in other sets of the Decalogue I found a surprise that the church did not tell communicants, cp. Exodus 21:15, 17, also compare Exodus 34:12-26. The third (or fourth) set is in Deuteronomy 5:6-12 (Deuteronomy means “repeated” or “repeat”}. All follow the tradition of the Hittites. Youngblood, Ronald. (1994). “Counting the Ten Commandments,” Biblical Review, December. http://members.bib-arch.org/publication.asp?PubID=BSBR&Volume=10&Issue=6&ArticleID=11.
  22. John 13:2 and Luke 22:3 detail a devil betraying a man by entering the man; but these inclusions come from Samarian myths and are not a part of the ancient Jewish world. This has been a source of hysteria for bible-worshipers even to the point where men with goatees are seen as devils, basing the assumption from the image of Pan and Greek theology who was a lover of music, dancing and sex: cf. www.requestline.com/pop/feature/1996/09/goatee. Ancient Egyptians were earlier. A general history of facial hair and its role in religion is at http://www.brotherryan.com/tag/goatees/
  23. John 13:23 One of them, the disciple whom Jesus loved, was reclining next to him: ἦν ἀνακείμενος εἷς ἐκ τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ ἐν τῷ κόλπῳ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ, ὃν ἠγάπα ὁ Ἰησοῦς·
  24. Genesis 24:12–15.
  25. Genesis 29: 12-13, 20-28. Their father Laban who is with his daughters plays a sizable role in ancient mythology. The names Laban, Rachel and Leah all point to ancient worship of Sin and Asherah in ancient Cana. The seven years that Jacob had to wait in order to marry each of his wives was a symbolic plagiarism in an effort to redefine dating, as each of the years represents the seven days in a lunar quarter. By marrying Rachel and Leah, Jacob symbolically married Asherah, the original Mesopotamian Queen of Heaven that the Vatican will usurp and incorporated into Christianity in the nineteenth century. Zimondi, Annette Grace (2004). “The prophet Jeremiah and the queen of heaven.” Unpublished thesis (M.A. in religion) Nashville, TN,USA: Vanderbilt University. Cp. Lanner, Laurel (1992). “Who Will Lament Her?”: the Feminine and the Fantastic in the Book of Nahum. Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies. London, UK: Continuum International Publishing Group. Vol. 434. Playing the Texts, Vol. 11. Chapter 2.1.2. Cp. ibid. chapter 2.2.3 For “The Queen of Heaven.”
  26. Genesis 11:29. Ref. Evans, Craig A & Sanders, James A. (1998). The Function of Scripture in early Jewish and Christian Tradition. Sheffield, UK, Sheffield Academic Press.
  27. Joshua 15:17.
  28. 2 Samuel 2-4.
  29. 1 Kings 11:1-3.
  30. Mason, Diane Elizabeth (2008). The Secret Vice: Masturbation in Victorian fiction and medical culture. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press.
  31. Tissot, S. A. D. (1767). Thoughts on the Sin of Onan: chiefly Extracted from a late Writer. London,UK: (s.n.). Wienholtz, William F. (1951). An interpretation of the Fall of Man: Psychological remifications of Masturbation and the concept of Original Sin. New York, NY, USA: William-Frederick Press. Raterman, Herbert J. (1971). Charity and Sex and the Young Man: Some thoughts on the Proper Attitude about Sex: God’s viewpoint; mortal sin and sexual temptations of young men; Masturbation. Cincinnati, OH, USA: self published. Van Driel, Mels & Vincent, Paul (2013). With the Hand: a History of Masturbation. London, UK: Reaktion Books.
  32. Genesis 38:9: “And” וַיֵּ֣דַע אֹונָ֔ן כִּ֛י לֹּ֥א לֹ֖ו יִהְיֶ֣ה הַזָּ֑רַע וְהָיָ֞ה אִם־בָּ֨א אֶל־אֵ֤שֶׁת אָחִיו֙ וְשִׁחֵ֣ת אַ֔רְצָה לְבִלְתִּ֥י נְתָן־זֶ֖רַע לְאָחִֽיו׃. The name Onan (אוֹנָן) is translated as “strong” and actually was a challenger to the gods of Genesis in other cultures. Dening, Sarah. The Mythology of Sex. London, UK: Macmillian 1996. Egyptian myth says that the sun god, Atom, created the first two human beings of earth through a sleight of masturbation. Graeco-Roman belief held that the god of masturbation was Mercury (Hermes) who taught it to his son Faunus (Pan).
  33. Leviticus 18:22: “You shall not lie with mankind, as with womankind: it is abomination”:  וְאֶ֨ת־זָכָ֔ר לֹ֥א תִשְׁכַּ֖ב מִשְׁכְּבֵ֣י אִשָּׁ֑ה תֹּועֵבָ֖ה הִֽוא׃: it has the same standard as Leviticus 17:16–a form of purity required in bathing, Cp. “If a man has sexual relations with a man as one does with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They are to be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads” Leviticus 20:13:וְאִ֗ישׁ אֲשֶׁ֨ר יִשְׁכַּ֤ב אֶת־זָכָר֙ מִשְׁכְּבֵ֣י אִשָּׁ֔ה תֹּועֵבָ֥ה עָשׂ֖וּ שְׁנֵיהֶ֑ם מֹ֥ות יוּמָ֖תוּ דְּמֵיהֶ֥ם בָּֽם׃. These passages are discussed later in philological settings.
  34. Lex Scantinia was introduced in the second century BCE, written more for harassing politicians than stopping any homosexual activity; ref. http://thecathedraldoor.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/lex-scantinia-roman-law-concerning.html. This is also the case in the Pauline injunction in the New Testament, but ancient societies showed adult males equally engaged, usually in oral simultaneous sex, or they had young boys that societies worldwide accepted to various degrees.
  35. Leviticus 19:27 and 21:5, Ezekiel 44:20. It was an ancient prohibition accepted by older Semitic tribes; see Jeremiah 9:26, 25:23 and 49:32. Growing beards was a reaction against Hittite, Elamites and Sumerians who were clean-shaven—but were considered immodest.
  36. Deuteronomy 22:5, 1 Timothy 2:9.
  37. Leviticus 11, but Jesus said all foods were clean: Mark 7:19, cp. Acts 10:15; gluttony was a sin even though one Jesus was a glutton: Deuteronomy 21:20; Proverbs 23:2; 2 Peter 1:5-7; 2 Timothy 3:1-9; 2 Corinthians 10:5. On Jesus’ gluttony read Matthew 11:19. Luke 7:34 portrays Jesus as a drunkard.
  38. Later in life I knew the philology of words and what evangelical said Leviticus printed is not at all what the words invoke or mean.
  39. In this context the word is spelled correctly.
  40. These sins are discussed in a later part of this collection of essays.
  41. Malachi 2:16.
  42. Matthew 19:9. Cp. Matthew 5:32
  43. 1 Corinthians 7:11.
  44. The Pericope de Adultera found in current editions of the Gospel of John (7:53-8:11) is not found in any place in any of the earliest surviving Greek Gospel manuscripts; neither in the two 3rd century papyrus witnesses to John – P66 and P75; it is not in the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus nor the Codex Vaticanus. It is considered at best a pious fraud to make Jesus appear to be forgiving and tolerant. The first surviving Greek manuscript to contain the pericope is the Latin/Greek diglot Codex Bezae of the late 4th or early 5th century. The Codex Fuldensis, which is positively dated to 546 CE, contains the adulterae pericope. Those opposing the authenticity of the verses as part of John are represented in the 20th century by men like Cadbury, Henry J. (1917, July 3). “A Possible Case of Lukan Authorship (John 7:53-8:11)” Harvard Theological Review, Vol. 10 No. 03: 237-244; Colwell, Ernest Cadman (1935, April 1). Book review: “Recent Developments in the Textual Criticism of the Greek Bible”. Classical Philology, Vol. 30 No. 2: 188-189; Metzger, Bruce (1971). A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament. Stuttgart, Deutschland: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, pp. 187-189; and Tregelles, Samuel Prideaux (1856). An Introduction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of the Holy Scripture. London, England: Wertheim & Macintosh, pp. 465-468. An opposing view is presented by Kyle R. Hughes (2013). “The Lukan Special Material and the Tradition History of the Pericope Adulterae,” Novum Testamentum 55.3: 232-251 who argues that if follows Lukan “special material” (the “L” source) that is rooted in early Christian writings even though they are not Johannine.
  45. The problem with roulette sex is the situation that the egg has a lifespan of just 12 to 24 hours whereas a sperm can last for about 72 hours. The rhythm method (Knaus–Ogino method) is typically 75% to 87% effective, leading most youth in the 1950s to refer to those who practiced rhythm as parents. When artificial forms of birth control became increasingly popular after 1970, the Roman Catholic Church came out against all forms of birth regulation and controls This spirited J F Kippley to lash out against Charles Westoff and Elise Jones who predicted that the rhythm method would soon be an historical footnote. Kippley argued that rhythm would become increasingly popular among people of faith who did not want to stem natural sexual activity but wanted to slow down the rate of conception. Kippley, J. F. (1977). “A more optimistic look at the birth control statistics” The CCL {Couple-to-Couple} Newsletter. November-December 4(3):159, on-line at http://www.deepdyve.com/lp/medline/a-more-optimistic-look-at-the-birth-control-statistics-3nLRK1iz5H. Scientific studies and statistics have not supported Kippley’s projection. Cf. Welton, Thurston S. (1960). Rhythm birth control: the modern method of birth control. New York, NY, USA: Grosset & Dunlap.
  46. A better sampling of rape in the Bible must include:

    Murder, rape, and pillage at Jabesh-gilead – Judges 21:10-24
    Murder, rape and pillage of the Midianites – Numbers 31:7-18
    David’s Punishment – Rape, Baby Killing in 2 Samuel 12:11-14 NAB
    Rape of Female Captives – Deuteronomy 21:10-14
    Rape of Sex Slaves – Exodus 21:7-11.

    For a discussion with textual criticism, read Ide, Arthur Frederick (1993). Catechism of Family Values based on the BibleArlington, TX, USA : Liberal Arts Press. pp. 39-40, 145-146, 196-224, 249f.

  47. 1 Corinthians 15:3–8.
  48. It is a Syriac name and only means stone: John 1:42. It was later translated into Greek at Petros, and into Latin as Petrus. There is no internal or external evidence that “Paul”/Saul knew Syriac. The translations were a later ploy to buttress claims that Jesus built a church and gave Peter control over it, but Paul makes no such claim as it would be heresy to the Council headed by Jesus’ natural brother James. Cf. Tabor, James D. (2012). Paul and Jesus: How the Apostle Transformed Christianity. New York, NY, USA: Simon & Schuster, pp. 29ff.
  49. Romans 3:25, 5:6–8, 8:3; 1 Corinthians 5:7.
  50. 1 Corinthians 15:20; Romans 1:4, 4:24; 2 Corinthians. 4:14; and more.
  51. 1 Corinthians 1:23; also 1 Corinthians 2:2, Galatians 3:1, 2 Corinthians 13:4, and more, while 1 Thessalonians 2:14–15 lays out the foundation for antisemitism. Crucified did not mean “on a cross” as it could have been being hung on a tree, pole or other means of torture but necessarily on an instrument of death.
  52. Reed, Jonathan L. (2000). Archaeology and the Galilean Jesus : a re-examination of the evidence. Harrisburg, Penn. : Trinity Press International, p. 103.
  53. Hebrews 5:5.
  54. Most apologists argue, wrongly, that Adoptionism was a heresy taught in Spain after 782 by Elipandus, archbishop of Toledo, and Felix, bishop of Urgel (Seo de Urgel) whose school held that Jesus at the time of his birth was purely human and only became the divine Son of God by adoption when he was baptized. Some argue that variations of this doctrine had been held as early as the third century by the Theodotians, Paul of Samosata, and by the Nestorians so as to excuse Saul/Paul’s original writing. The line was actually plagiarized from Psalm 2:7: אֲסַפְּרָ֗ה אֶֽ֫ל חֹ֥ק יְֽהוָ֗ה אָמַ֘ר אֵלַ֥י בְּנִ֥י אַ֑תָּה אֲ֝נִ֗י הַיֹּ֥ום יְלִדְתִּֽיךָ׃ and in its original form was a couplet.
  55. Ref. 1 Corinthians 1:22-23.
  56. A small sampling would include: Ide, Arthur Frederick (1984). The Teachings of Jesus on Women. Dallas, TX, USA: Texas Independent Press. Ide, Arthur Frederick  (1984). Jews, Jesus & woman in the apostolic age : with a synopsis, parallel translation & critical commentary on New Testament references to women in the life & ministry of Jesus Christ and the apostleship He commissioned women to join. Mesquite, TX, USA: IHP. Ide, Arthur Frederick (1985). God’s girls : ordination of women in the early Christian & Gnostic churches. Garland, TX, USA: Tangelwüld, 1986, ©1985. Ide, Arthur Frederick (1991). Zoar and her Sisters: Homosexuality, the Bible & Jesus Christ. Oak Cliff, TX, USA: Minuteman Press.  Ide, Arthur Frederick (1999). The Resurrection : an analysis of the Gospels, writings of St. Paul, and historical records. Chicago, IL, USA: Sepore. Ide, Arthur Frederick (2004). Crucifixion: What the Bible Really Says. Chicago, IL: Sepore.
  57. For example: Ide, Arthur Frederick (1968). “An Apology for the Petrine Doctrine” (Unpublished MA thesis) Cedar Falls, IA, USA: University of Northern Iowa.  Ide, Arthur Frederick (1973), “This Cup Shall Not Pass Away” An Historical Study of the development of Thomas Becket’s attitude toward his own death.  (Unpublished Ph.D. thesis) Pittsburgh, PA, USA: Carnegie-Mellon University.
  58. נָצְרַת it is a word that does not appear in any pre-Christian texts, it is a messianic word for a branch (נֵ֫צֶר ne-ser or netzer) of the House of David in Isaiah 11:1, but the later Jews did not connect the word to any prophesy. Carruth, Shawn; Robinson, James McConkey; Heil, Christoph (1996). Q 4:1-13,16: the temptations of Jesus : Nazara. East Walpole, MA. USA: Peeters Publishers. p. 415.
  59. Genesis 1:22ff; “the Lord” in the plural form meaning gods or merchants.
  60. cp. Qur’an Chapter 51 Az-Zariyat vs. 29.
  61. Joshua 19:10-16. Eusebius Pamphili, Ecclesiastical History, I, vii, § 14. Witherington III, Ben (1995). The Jesus quest: the Third Search for the Jew of Nazareth. Downers Grove, IL,USA: InterVarsity Press. Ehrman, Bart D. (2012). Did Jesus exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth. New York, NY, USA: HarperOne. Evans, C. Stephen (1996). The historical Christ and the Jesus of faith: the incarnational narrative as history. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. Burton, Henry (1660). Jesu-vvorship confuted, or Certain arguments against bowing at the name Jesus: proving to be idolatrous and superstitious and so utterly unlawful: with objections to the contrary fully answered. London, England: Printed for H. G. …. Priestley, Joseph (1783). A general view of the arguments for the unity of God and against the divinity and pre-eistence of Christ, from reason, from scriptures, and from history. Birmingham, (England): Printed by Piercy and Jones, for J. Johnson. McMichael, Steven J. / de Espina, Alphonso (1994). Was Jesus of Nazareth the Messiah? Alphonos de Espina’s argument against the Jews in the Fortalitium fidei (c. 1464). Atlanta, GA, USA: Scholars Press. Ochs, Christoph (2013). “Matthaeus Adversus Christianos: the use of the Gospel of Matthew in Jewish polemics against the divinity of Jesus.” Unpublished thesis (Ph.D.) University of Nottingham; Nottingham, UK: University of Nottingham. Reissued in the series Wissenshaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. 2 Reihem 350. Shaeffer, Robert (1991). The Making of the Messiah: Christianity and Resentment. Buffalo, NY, USA: Prometheus Books.
  62. John 1:46: καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ναθαναήλ Ἐκ Ναζαρὲτ δύναταί τι ἀγαθὸν εἶναι λέγει αὐτῷ Φίλιππος Ἔρχου καὶ ἴδε.
  63. Matthew 2:23: καὶ ἐλθὼν κατῴκησεν εἰς πόλιν λεγομένην Ναζαρέτ· ὅπως πληρωθῇ τὸ ῥηθὲν διὰ τῶν προφητῶν ὅτι Ναζωραῖος κληθήσεται.
  64. The Nazarenes were an off-shoot sect of the Essenes. Acts 24:5: “We have found this man to be a troublemaker, stirring up riots among the Jews all over the world. He is a ringleader of the Nazarene sect: εὑρόντες γὰρ τὸν ἄνδρα τοῦτον λοιμὸν καὶ κινοῦντα στάσιν πᾶσιν τοῖς Ἰουδαίοις τοῖς κατὰ τὴν οἰκουμένην πρωτοστάτην τε τῆς τῶν Ναζωραίων αἱρέσεως. The sect was universally unpopular and its teachers rejected. The condemnation about a troublemaker is referencing Paul who was from Tarsus and not Nazareth. It is a claim that Nazarenes were troublemakers and would be warlords, in keeping with Matthew 10:34.

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